Growing Fish and Plants Together…In A Parking Lot

Sustainable World Media

On our first visit to Santa Barbara Aquaponics, we weren’t sure what to expect.  When we heard that Kevin Childerley and Randy Turner were growing vegetables and raising fish in a parking lot, we wanted to see for ourselves how Aquaponics, a closed loop system works.

When we arrived at the site, we were greeted by Kevin Childerley, an enthusiastic and entertaining Aquaponics proponent. “Welcome to Santa Barbara Aquaponics!” he told us as he opened the gate to let us in. “This is our first system. We’re trying things out and seeing what works and what doesn’t.” Kevin then led us over to a tank, filled with Channel Catfish which we observed with an “AquaScope.” (a plastic tube Kevin made that’s used to view the fish underwater.)  The fish looked healthy and were actively swimming about. Kevin explained that the fish poop is filtered in a bio-filter and is then…

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The Monsanto-Permaculture Alliance: Committed To Sustainable Agriculture

Monsanto recently announced the formation of a new MPCA or Monsanto Permaculture Alliance. The MPCA was formed to transition Monsanto from an herbicide and GMO manufacturer into a leader in the organic agriculture movement. The MPCA plans to “turn Monsanto’s liabilities into assets” using Permaculture principles.

As one company executive stated, “After attending our first PDC or Permaculture Design Course, Monsanto realized that the problem is the solution… And that we are the problem.”

Permaculture, a natural design system with roots in Australia, was created by founders Bill Mollison and David Holmgren  in the 1970’s.  There are now thousands of Permaculture projects around the globe that demonstrate how Permaculture principles can be used to design resilient, sustainable and diverse landscapes and human settlements.

While some have applauded Monsanto’s efforts, many industry observers have wondered whether it’s possible to transform what has been a GMO-producing, seed patenting, farmer-suing and herbicide manufacturing behemoth into a proponent of organic agriculture?  According to Monsanto, the answer is not only that’s it’s possible, but that it’s already happening.  As one representative for the company said, “We have the brains. We have the technology. We have the resources. The only thing missing is the knowledge and that’s why hundreds of Permaculture teachers are already on their way to Monsanto locations around the globe to teach our staff  how to work with nature, instead of against her.”

Started in 1901 Monsanto prospered after convincing the world that it was wise and necessary to poison its food supply with toxins. In 1969, Monsanto began its rise to the top with the best-selling herbicide Lasso and since then has dominated the world herbicide market with RoundUp.

Despite grossing million of dollars last year, not all has been rosy for the GMO giant lately.  New studies showing that RoundUp is much more damaging to human and ecosystem health than previously believed, heated debates over the safety and labeling of GMO food and negative press about their litigious habit of suing farmers have all made Monsanto a controversial company.

Monsanto will continue to work with farmers and crops, but in a more holistic way.  “After decades of study we have sadly concluded that Nature knows more than Monsanto. We hate to admit it, but research shows that organic regenerative agriculture modeled on natural systems is the best way to safely and efficiently feed our hungry world.”

What prompted the largest producer of patented seeds to turn to Permaculture? Like many great endeavors, it started with a dream. One of Monsanto’s top executives explains, “I had a nightmare where I had to arrest my own grandfather for saving seeds. If he was alive today, he probably would be sued by Monsanto- he was a farmer.  After the dream, which was really a nightmare, I sat up in bed and thought, ‘What the f*** are we doing?’  I couldn’t sleep, so I turned my computer on and started Googling terms like seed saving, organic farming and nature. That’s when I first saw the term Permaculture. After reading about the two week  Permaculture Design Course,  I was nervous- especially about the talent show, but  I signed up and and was the first in the company to complete my PDC.  At Monsanto, we claim to be committed to sustainable agriculture,  but after the course I realized what sustainable really means. Agriculture has to be regenerative or else it’s harmful. Who knew the soil was alive? Monsanto didn’t, but apparently a lot of other people did and that’s why we’ve formed our new board .”

The  MPCA Advisory Board will guide Monsanto in its transition from a conventional corporation to an organic one.

President- Wendell Berry

Vice PresidentVandana Shiva

Integrated Pest Management Coordinator- Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet

Soil Health Consultant- Dr. Elaine Ingham, Doug Weatherbee

Organic Agriculture Advisors-  Joel Salatin, Wes JacksonDarren DohertyRonnie Cummins

Livestock and Climate Change- Allan Savory, Abe Collins, Julious Piti, Peter Donovan

Clean Water Experts- Brock Dolman, Brad Lancaster

Permaculture Advisors- Bill Mollison, David Holmgren, Geoff Lawton, Penny LivingstonToby Hemenway and Larry Santoyo

Press- Michael Pollan

Monsanto also has a new Seven Point Plan based on the Permaculture Ethics of Earth Care, People Care and Fair Share.
1.) Retribution– Monsanto will publicly apologize to the world for its previous rampant disregard for ecosystem, human and animal health and dedicate its vast resources to cleaning up the planet.
2.) Reimbursement– Farmers who were sued by Monsanto will be paid back in full, plus damages and interest.
3.) Toxic Waste Clean Ups– GM fields and adjoining waterways will be treated for contamination and restored using mycoremediation,  phytoremediation, bioremediation and permaculture.
4.) Organic Regenerative Farming-  Monsanto will study, promote and offer free trainings in the following land stewardship methods including, but not limited to: cover cropping, integrated pest management, low or no till plowing, composting, nontoxic weed control, aquaponics, biodynamic farming and rangeland management.
5.) Seed Bank– All of Monsanto’s seeds will be organically grown with all patents removed. Monsanto will donate money to organic seed banks around the world.
6.) GMO Free Zone Monsanto will no longer research, use or sell genetically modified organisms. The microscopes previously used for GM research will be re-purposed and used for studying microbes in the Soil Food Web.
7.) Zero Waste– Monsanto will be a zero waste company.

Now that Monsanto is convinced that regenerative organic agriculture is the best way to feed a hungry world, will other ag giants like Dow AgroSciences, Syngenta and Bayer follow?  Thanks to Permaculture and the newly formed MPCA, Monsanto’s claim to be “Committed to Sustainable Agriculture” will soon prove to be true.

Note: This is a satirical piece that I wrote about possibilities. This is not true.  It’s my vision of what could happen if bio-tech agriculture and Permaculture came together. In my experience Permaculture offers a new and more holistic way of seeing the world. I imagined what would happen if a Monsanto executive took a Permaculture course, had an epiphany about natural systems and became instrumental in changing the company’s direction. It wasn’t intended to mislead anyone about Monsanto, but was an attempt to use humor to help envision a better world.

 

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The Monsanto-Permaculture Alliance: Committed To Sustainable Agriculture

Monsanto recently announced the formation of a new MPCA or Monsanto Permaculture Alliance. The MPCA was formed to transition Monsanto from an herbicide and GMO manufacturer into a leader in the organic agriculture movement. The MPCA plans to “turn Monsanto’s liabilities into assets” using Permaculture principles.

As one company executive stated, “After attending our first PDC or Permaculture Design Course, Monsanto realized that the problem is the solution… And that we are the problem.”

Permaculture, a natural design system with roots in Australia, was created by founders Bill Mollison and David Holmgren  in the 1970’s.  There are now thousands of Permaculture projects around the globe that demonstrate how Permaculture principles can be used to design resilient, sustainable and diverse landscapes and human settlements.

While some have applauded Monsanto’s efforts, many industry observers have wondered whether it’s possible to transform what has been a GMO-producing, seed patenting, farmer-suing and herbicide manufacturing behemoth into a proponent of organic agriculture?  According to Monsanto, the answer is not only that’s it’s possible, but that it’s already happening.  As one representative for the company said, “We have the brains. We have the technology. We have the resources. The only thing missing is the knowledge and that’s why hundreds of Permaculture teachers are already on their way to Monsanto locations around the globe to teach our staff  how to work with nature, instead of against her.”

Started in 1901 Monsanto prospered after convincing the world that it was wise and necessary to poison its food supply with toxins. In 1969, Monsanto began its rise to the top with the best-selling herbicide Lasso and since then has dominated the world herbicide market with RoundUp.

Despite grossing million of dollars last year, not all has been rosy for the GMO giant lately.  New studies showing that RoundUp is much more damaging to human and ecosystem health than previously believed, heated debates over the safety and labeling of GMO food and negative press about their litigious habit of suing farmers have all made Monsanto a controversial company.

Monsanto will continue to work with farmers and crops, but in a more holistic way.  “After decades of study we have sadly concluded that Nature knows more than Monsanto. We hate to admit it, but research shows that organic regenerative agriculture modeled on natural systems is the best way to safely and efficiently feed our hungry world.”

What prompted the largest producer of patented seeds to turn to Permaculture? Like many great endeavors, it started with a dream. One of Monsanto’s top executives explains, “I had a nightmare where I had to arrest my own grandfather for saving seeds. If he was alive today, he probably would be sued by Monsanto- he was a farmer.  After the dream, which was really a nightmare, I sat up in bed and thought, ‘What the f*** are we doing?’  I couldn’t sleep, so I turned my computer on and started Googling terms like seed saving, organic farming and nature. That’s when I first saw the term Permaculture. After reading about the two week  Permaculture Design Course,  I was nervous- especially about the talent show, but  I signed up and and was the first in the company to complete my PDC.  At Monsanto, we claim to be committed to sustainable agriculture,  but after the course I realized what sustainable really means. Agriculture has to be regenerative or else it’s harmful. Who knew the soil was alive? Monsanto didn’t, but apparently a lot of other people did and that’s why we’ve formed our new board .”

The  MPCA Advisory Board will guide Monsanto in its transition from a conventional corporation to an organic one.

President- Wendell Berry

Vice PresidentVandana Shiva

Integrated Pest Management Coordinator- Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet

Soil Health Consultant- Dr. Elaine Ingham, Doug Weatherbee

Organic Agriculture Advisors-  Joel Salatin, Wes JacksonDarren DohertyRonnie Cummins

Livestock and Climate Change- Allan Savory, Abe Collins, Julious Piti, Peter Donovan

Clean Water Experts- Brock Dolman, Brad Lancaster

Permaculture Advisors- Bill Mollison, David Holmgren, Geoff Lawton, Penny LivingstonToby Hemenway and Larry Santoyo

Press- Michael Pollan

Monsanto also has a new Seven Point Plan based on the Permaculture Ethics of Earth Care, People Care and Fair Share.
1.) Retribution– Monsanto will publicly apologize to the world for its previous rampant disregard for ecosystem, human and animal health and dedicate its vast resources to cleaning up the planet.
2.) Reimbursement– Farmers who were sued by Monsanto will be paid back in full, plus damages and interest.
3.) Toxic Waste Clean Ups– GM fields and adjoining waterways will be treated for contamination and restored using mycoremediation,  phytoremediation, bioremediation and permaculture.
4.) Organic Regenerative Farming-  Monsanto will study, promote and offer free trainings in the following land stewardship methods including, but not limited to: cover cropping, integrated pest management, low or no till plowing, composting, nontoxic weed control, aquaponics, biodynamic farming and rangeland management.
5.) Seed Bank– All of Monsanto’s seeds will be organically grown with all patents removed. Monsanto will donate money to organic seed banks around the world.
6.) GMO Free Zone Monsanto will no longer research, use or sell genetically modified organisms. The microscopes previously used for GM research will be re-purposed and used for studying microbes in the Soil Food Web.
7.) Zero Waste– Monsanto will be a zero waste company.

Now that Monsanto is convinced that regenerative organic agriculture is the best way to feed a hungry world, will other ag giants like Dow AgroSciences, Syngenta and Bayer follow?  Thanks to Permaculture and the newly formed MPCA, Monsanto’s claim to be “Committed to Sustainable Agriculture” will soon prove to be true.

Note: This is a satirical piece that I wrote about possibilities. This is not true.  It’s my vision of what could happen if bio-tech agriculture and Permaculture came together. In my experience Permaculture offers a new and more holistic way of seeing the world. I imagined what would happen if a Monsanto executive took a Permaculture course, had an epiphany about natural systems and became instrumental in changing the company’s direction. It wasn’t intended to mislead anyone about Monsanto, but was an attempt to use humor to help envision a better world.

 

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When We Feed The Soil, We Feed Ourselves

Any time that we place compostable food scraps in the trash we are throwing away valuable natural resources. In Santa Barbara County, an estimated 700 tons of trash a day goes to our landfill and of that, about 40% is considered compostable. What happens to food scraps in the landfill? After being buried under layers of trash and dirt, food scraps begin to slowly decompose and emit Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC’s) and methane- a potent climate change causing gas.

Food Scraps On Their Way To A Worm Bin

Food Scraps- Landfill or Compost?

What to do? Compost!  Composting your food scraps turns your trash into treasure, saves you money on gardening inputs, and helps you become part of the solution to climate change.  Composting is easy, doesn’t require a lot of space, tools or materials and offers you a crash course in observing decomposition- a much maligned and feared natural process.  Finished compost is an excellent soil amendment. When you feed the soil with compost, you are improving soil tilth and providing plants with beneficial nutrients and microbes.

Composting Educator Bill Palmisano

Composting Educator Bill Palmisano

Here are four ways to get started on your journey of feeding the soil.  By creating the conditions for compost to happen you are calling in theFBI- fungi, bacteria, and invertebrates to do the composting work for you.

1.) Compost Piles– These require the most land area, at least 3’x3’x3′.  By layering dry sticks, cardboard and leaves (carbon) with food scraps, grass, and yard waste (nitrogen) you create a rich haven for composting bacteria to thrive. When your pile heats up, you’re on your way to creating your first batch of “black gold.” Be sure to keep your pile well aerated by turning it and watering it in dry climates.

2.) Compost Bins– Some people like to place their food scraps in a reclosable bin and let them decompose slowly. Sometimes this method can get a bit smelly (anaerobic), but it’s easy and convenient. The drawback is that anaerobic compost emits methane gas.

3.) Worms To The Rescue- Remember ant farms? Worm bins are worm farms where you can watch nature working for you.  A fun and fascinating way to quickly and efficiently create compost, opening the lid to your worm bin is like opening the door to another world.

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A Climate of Change- Time For Solutions

Our film The Soil Solution is now on tour.

Sustainable World Media

The Soil Solution is one of thirteen films that have been selected to tour with the A Climate of Change program sponsored by the Wild and Scenic Film Festival, 350.org, and The TRUST Campaign. This climate-only film festival program is already on the road.  Organizers of the tour have produced a Climate Action Handbook created to inspire and motivate viewers to take action in their communities.

The Wild & Scenic Film Festival On Tour works with groups of all kinds across the country who host the festival to raise awareness for their campaigns, recruit new activists, raise funds and bring global and regional issues to the local level. To hold the festival in your town  click here. Thanks to Patagonia, there are grants available for college or university organizations who host A Climate of Change event and partner with a local environmental group.

 

 

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Plant The Rain! Brad Lancaster Shows You How

Rainwater harvesting guru Brad Lancaster has a lot to say about water. In his books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands, Volumes 1 and 2 Lancaster writes about the importance of “planting the rain” and shares with readers the many benefits they receive when they learn how to keep their rainwater on site.

In urban environments most rainwater falls onto impervious surfaces. The water runs off quickly, carrying litter and pollutants with it as it flows directly into creeks, rivers and oceans. Why not use this free resource to water your garden or lawn?

The benefits of harvesting rain are many. Rainwater falls from the sky for free. Rainwater doesn’t contain salt and is a natural fertilizer that’s great for plants. When you harvest rain, you help reduce flooding and surface runoff. Keeping your rain in your garden or yard can reduce your water bill.  If you live in an area with little rain, don’t despair. Lancaster harvests over 100,000 gallons yearly (379,000 liters) of rain and runoff in the soil of his 1/8-acre home in Tuscon, AZ.  (12″ or 305 mm of average annual rainfall per year.)

Click here to listen to a Sustainable World Radio interview with Brad.

To learn more, watch this short video with Brad Lancaster on Rainwater Harvesting Basics. 

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February 4, 2013 · 6:05 pm

Monsanto vs. Nature

Monsanto hit the genetically modified ball out of the park in California’s November election after pouring over $7 million  into defeating Proposition 37, the initiative measure that would have required labels on genetically modified food sold in California supermarkets.

Playing for the Monsanto team (opponents of labeling) we find the usual suspects: Nestle, Pepsico, DuPont, Kraft, General Mills, Dow Chemical, Kellogg, Campbell Soup Company, J. M. Smuckers, Mars, Bumble Bee, Sara Lee, Hershey and dozens of others. (Click here for a complete list.)  Together, these junk food and pesticide companies contributed over $45,000,000 to stop the labeling of foods containing genetically modified organisms (GMO’s).

On the team for Nature (advocates for labeling) we find organizations, individuals and food companies including the California Nurses Association, Pesticide Action Network, Nature’s Path Foods, Annie’s, Organic Consumers Association, author Michael Pollan, Dr. Joseph Mercola and millions of Californians who were not swayed by Monsanto’s aggressive anti-labeling campaign. (Click here for a complete list.)

Although Prop 37 was defeated 53.1% to 46.9%, the game is far from over and Monsanto and company are on the losing team.

Consumers who are concerned about the health risks of eating GM food can now avoid the products of the companies who bankrolled Prop. 37’s loss. A boycott could cost these corporations millions of dollars in lost profits.

Monsanto and other GMO producers insist that genetically modified crops are safe and hold great promise for feeding a hungry planet, but GM crops actually have a detrimental effect on the natural world.  Cross pollination, “Super Weeds”,  and increased use of toxic herbicides are some of the unintended  consequences of GM crops.

With its seemingly endless budget, misleading ads rife with false information and a propensity to lie for its own benefit, Monsanto seems to have forgotten one thing:

Nature Bats Last.

And when She and her supporters hit the GM Labeling home run out of the park, states across the county will begin passing GM labeling laws. Once consumers know that they are eating food containing GM organisms, sales of these products will drop and manufacturers of GM food will be forced to change their game plan.  When  consumers demand to know what is in their food and the impact their food choices have on the environment,  this will be the start of a real food revolution where Nature, not Monsanto, wins.

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The REAL Green Revolution In Africa: Permaculture in Zimbabwe

I met with Julious Piti several times during his world tour last summer.  Julious is a Permaculture designer and teacher, organic farmer and conflict facilitator  based in Zimbabwe. Julious has been using Permaculture in Africa to restore the health of both land and community. A founding member of the Chikukwa Ecological Land Trust (CELUCT) and now the Director of PORET (Participatory Organic Research Extension and Training), Julious’ work shows that degraded land can be transformed into verdant productive farms and food forests..  Julious’ new organization PORET supports farmers in dry-land areas and works to address hunger, malnutrition, and poverty.  In 2007, PORET won the Zimbabwe National Environmental Award.

Julious Piti- "Permaculture is gorgeous."

Julious Piti- “Permaculture is gorgeous.”

 

 

 

 

 

Julious also works in conflict resolution and helped develop a handbook called The Three Circles of Knowledge; How to Build Constructive Community Relations by Understanding Conflicts in Rural African Communities.

In this podcast interview, The REAL Green Revolution In Africa  Julious talks about how he has used Permaculture to nourish the health of the land and people in Zimbabwe.

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